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Making Mars Speak Human

The University of Wales Press contributes to a publication from an active NASA mission which highlights the Welsh language With artistic shots of actively eroding slopes, impact craters, strange polar landscapes, avalanches, and spectacular descent pictures of probes like the Phoenix Lander and the Mars Science Laboratory, a new publication by the University of Arizona

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Werewolves, Wolves and the Gothic

by Dr Robert McKay and Dr John Miller, editors of Werewolves, Wolves and the Gothic The werewolf is the least tracked of the three cardinal species of monster, overshadowed in the moonlight by vampires and the recent zombie hordes. We have learned that such figures offer (as David Punter writes of the Gothic) ‘a very

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UWP at the National Eisteddfod 2017

The University of Wales Press once again attended the National Eisteddfod – this year held in Anglesey from the 4th to the 12th August. The Press set up shop in the University of Wales tent, with hundreds of Welsh and English-language books on offer. Many of our authors were also in attendance, giving a fascinating

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UWP title wins prestigious international Gothic writing award

The Gothic and the Carnivalesque in American Culture (Gothic Literary Studies) by Dr Timothy Jones has been announced as co-winner of the prestigious Allan Lloyd Smith Memorial Prize – an international prize for gothic criticism. Announced as part of the International Gothic Association’s (IGA) biannual conference in Mexico, the book, which is published by the University

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What are the origins of Flintshire’s place-names?

By Hywel Wyn Owen, co-author of Place Names of Flintshire Flintshire is one of the most fascinating counties in Wales in terms of history, and almost all its historical developments are reflected in its place-names – Alun, Clwyd and Elwy are very old Brythonic river names; Prestatyn, Rhuddlan and Hawarden were recorded in the Domesday

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Why Wales Never Was

by Simon Brooks, author of Why Wales Never Was In When Was Wales? Gwyn Alf Williams claims that Wales is remade by the Welsh from generation to generation, ‘if they want to’. Wales is thus always ‘now’; despite societal, cultural and linguistic change, Wales is always ‘here’. Why Wales Never Was is in broad agreement,

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Memoir and Identity in Welsh Patagonia

by Geraldine Lublin, author of Memoir and Identity in Welsh Patagonia: Voices from a Settler Community in Argentina In a recent interview with BBC Radio Cymru, I was asked if the Welsh should apologise to Patagonia’s indigenous peoples for taking their land. It is an interesting and complex question to which I was unable to respond

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Community Organization and Development

by Steve Clarke, author of Community Organization and Development: from its history towards a model for the future A friend of mine said recently that, although there were probably more people in the development business today than previously, no-one now mentioned the words ‘community development’ in their analysis of an issue or approach to a problem. 

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The Association for Welsh Writing in English conference 2017

The Association for Welsh Writing in English conference, Gregynog, 12-14 May 2017 by Llion Wigley, Commissioning Editor for Welsh Language and Topics The Association of Welsh Writing in English annual conference is always a highlight of the academic calendar in Wales, more so than ever this year as the theme was multi-disciplinarity. This opened up what

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M. Wynn Thomas: a mapping of modern Wales

by M. Wynn Thomas, author of All That Is Wales: The Collected Essays of M. Wynn Thomas I still remember a car journey I made a quarter of century ago. Starting from Cardiff I skirted post-industrial Merthyr, marvelled at the bare majesty of the Beacons, wound my way through the verdant mid-Wales countryside, and ended in

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The Evolution of Medieval Romance in Iceland

by Marianne E. Kalinke, author of Stories Set Forth with Fair Words: The Evolution of Medieval Romance in Iceland Iceland’s unique contribution to medieval literature are the sagas, the thirteenth-century epics that fuse history and legend in a vernacular prose form. Concurrently, translations of more or less contemporary French literature, of courtly lays and romances and

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The Controversies of Entrancement

by Professor Ruth Finnegan, author of Entrancement: The consciousness of dreaming, music and the world, an edited volume on the study of imagination, death and shared consciousness. Dr Finnegan was the recipient of the Royal Anthropological Institute’s Rivers Memorial Medal in 2016. This book should never have been written. Let alone published. Well, so a

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