UWP

New Editors for Wales Journal of Education

I am delighted to announce that we have confirmed our brand new Journal Editor team for the Wales Journal of Education: Gary Beauchamp from Cardiff Metropolitan University, Thomas Crick from Swansea University, and Enlli Thomas from Bangor University. Our new Journal Editors bring with them a wealth of educational experience. Each has a strong track

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Coastal Systems and Climate Change Education

The publication of the third edition of Coastal Systems in 2016 by the University of Wales Press was timed so that, as I outline in my preface to the book, the edition included the most up-to-date information from the latest report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published in 2014. Indeed, the publication

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Freedom Music: Wales, Emancipation and Jazz 1850-1950

Jen Wilson introduces her book, Freedom Music: Wales, Emancipation and Jazz 1850-1950 This book was a slow burn, probably from that day in school when the piano lid was slammed down by the deputy head, near-missing my fingers, all for ‘lowering the decorum of the whole school’ etc. I was 14, and the piano remained

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Introducing Medieval Animals

A new series from the University of Wales Press, introduced by series editors Dr Diane Heath and Dr Victoria Blud. Animals are good to think with, wrote Claude Lévi-Strauss, and ‘Medieval Animals’ is designed to enable the curious reader to do just that. The aim of this series is to promote work that challenges preconceptions about

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Getting to know water – inside and out

Luci Attala introduces How Water Makes Us Human: Engagements with the Materiality of Water, the first book in the Materialities in Anthropology and Archaeology series. I am not a great water drinker; I prefer to get into it. As I have grown older it is the quietness that is created by going deep under the water that

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Medieval Wales c.1050-1332: Centuries of Ambiguity

David Stephenson introduces Medieval Wales c.1050-1332: Centuries of Ambiguity. Long after it was published in 1911, Sir John Edward Lloyd’s History of Wales from the Earliest Times to the Edwardian Conquest remained the most influential book on the medieval centuries in Wales. The picture painted by Lloyd was in essence simple: a succession of great Welsh

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Dissonant Neighbours: Early Welsh and English Poetry

David Callander introduces Dissonant Neighbours: Narrative Progress in Early Welsh and English Poetry. Scholars in recent years have shown an increased and more explicit interest in medieval multilingualism. The study of codices and texts in multiple languages, quite a norm for much of the medieval period, has led to exciting new work and opened up fresh avenues

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Having a Go at the Kaiser: A Welsh Family at War

Gethin Matthews introduces Having a Go at the Kaiser: A Welsh Family at War, which has been nominated for Wales Book of the Year 2019. The book ‘Having a Go at the Kaiser’: A Welsh Family at War was launched at an event in Mynyddbach chapel, north Swansea, on 8 November 2018. It is based

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Wales Book of the Year 2019

The University of Wales Press is delighted to receive two nominations for Wales Book of the Year 2019. Congratulations to Gethin Matthews and Lisa Sheppard, whose books have been shortlisted in the Creative Non-fiction category. Having a Go at the Kaiser: A Welsh Family at War by Gethin Matthews This book is based on more

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Author blog: Minerva’s Gothics

Elizabeth Neiman introduces her new book, Minerva’s Gothics: The Politics and Poetics of Romantic Exchange, 1780-1820. Between 1790 and 1820, William Lane’s London printing press Minerva published an unprecedented number of novels, many by obscure female authors. Because Minerva novels catered to the day’s fashion for sentimental themes and Gothic romance, they were and still are

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The Role of Wales in UK Nuclear History

John Baylis introduces his new book, Wales and the Bomb: The Role of Welsh Scientists and Engineers in the British Nuclear Programme. The history of the British nuclear weapons programme from the Second World War onwards is now well known. We also know quite a lot about some of the central figures, like William Penney, involved

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Author blog: Soul-Health

Daniel McCann introduces his new book, Soul-Health: Therapeutic Reading in Later Medieval England. The connection between reading and healing has a history far deeper and far darker than modern ‘bibliotherapeutics’ would lead us to believe. While you don’t have to look far to find accounts of ‘consoling fictions’ offering mental and physical health, looking a

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